Agenda and draft minutes

Venue: Council Chamber - Deanes. View directions

Contact: Democratic Services Team 

Link: Video recording

Items
No. Item

26/19

Apologies for absence

Minutes:

Apologies for absence were received from Councillors M Bound and Eachus.

27/19

Declarations of interest

Minutes:

There were no declarations of interest.

28/19

Minutes of the meeting held on 9 May and 16 May 2019 pdf icon PDF 192 KB

The Chair will move that the minutes of the meeting be signed as a correct record. The only part of the minutes that can be discussed is their accuracy.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The minutes of the meetings held on 9 May 2019 and 16 May 2019 were confirmed as an accurate record and signed by the Mayor.

29/19

Announcements

Minutes:

The Mayor made the following announcements:

 

1)            The first few months in her role as Mayor had been busy incorporating a visit to Alencon to celebrate 50 years of twinning and to Euskirchen to celebrate the anniversary of when they became a borough.  She added that both towns appreciate being twinned with Basingstoke.

 

2)            The annual festival of sport with Euskirchen had taken place which Basingstoke had won.  She thanked Kevin Laing, Geoff Butler and Maria Henry for their work in organising the event.

 

The Cabinet Member for Planning, Infrastructure and Natural Environment and the Natural Environment Team Leader presented the Mayor with an award from the Chartered Institute of Ecology and Environment Management (CIEEM).  Basingstoke and Deane Borough Council had been shortlisted for the Planning Authority of the Year Award and was highly commended for the council’s approach to protecting and enhancing the natural environment of the borough.

 

 

30/19

The Mayor to make presentations of certificates of Public Service to former Members of the Council

Minutes:

The Mayor presented a public service certificate to past councillors Robert Golding and Marilyn Tucker and a long service award for 20 years’ service to Councillor Paul Frankum.

 

She added that public service certificates would be sent to past councillors Donald Sherlock, Jonathan Richards, Robert Tate, Stuart Parker and Joyce Bowyer and a long service award to Councillor Laura James.

 

 

31/19

Questions from members of the public

To receive and answer any questions from the public.

(Questions must be received in writing by Democratic Services no later than noon on Tuesday 16 July 2019)

Minutes:

The following question was asked by Mr Heath.

 

Once (or if) a climate emergency has been declared by the council, what does it intend to do to:

 

  1. Reduce the level of climate change being caused by greenhouse gas emissions from Basingstoke and

 

  1. Limit the impact climate change will have on the people of Basingstoke

 

When does it intend to do this and what specific and measurable targets is it going to set to ensure the action being taken is effective?

 

Answer – Leader of the Council

 

The fact that three of the parties have put in motions on this means that we are taking it seriously and I hope that my engagement with residents over the last couple of weeks indicates that I as Leader have taken it seriously and taken it on board.

 

I thank you for raising this important issue. Making us aware of your concerns  also crystallises our concerns.  The fact that there are motions, climate change is an issue that affects us all throughout all the borough and throughout  the world.  It is right that you point out that we have our own targets and we should be moving things forward with clear and measurable targets for us as a council.  It is for our residents and our partners to reduce the level of greenhouse gasses emitted locally.  Clearly we will debate the issue in more detail through the motions however I would like to highlight something we all should be ambitious about. We have to play our part in this, but of course the objectives need to be ambitious but sufficiently ambitious that we will not fail in them but it gives us a stretch in what we do but we also do not what them to be unrealistic or unachievable because we want to champion what we do and say we do it for our residents and the bigger world.  We are currently in the process of reviewing our actions and receiving advice on the steps that we should be taking to play our part as leaders in our greater community.  Once we have had the opportunity to consider it in sufficient detail I am sure Councillor Eachus, who is not here tonight, will be in a position to provide not just us councillors with an update but the wider community and set targets of what we can achieve.

32/19

Petitions

To receive petitions.

(Notice of petitions must be received in writing by Democratic Services, no later than noon on Tuesday 16 July 2019)

Minutes:

No petitions were received.

33/19

Allocation of Seats to Political Groups pdf icon PDF 602 KB

Report of the Monitoring Officer

Minutes:

Resolved: That Council

 

1)            Agree the changes to the committee sizes and scheme of proportionality for the remainder of 2019/20, following the recent change to the political composition of the Council.

2)            Agree that the composition of Standards Committee departs from political proportionality.

3)            Note that in the scheme of proportionality for the remainder of 2019/20, the Audit and Accounts Committee and Manydown Overview Committee will have ten Members.

34/19

Resignations and appointments pdf icon PDF 182 KB

a) to receive resignations from Committees and to make any necessary re-appointments

 

 

b) to receive resignations from Outside Bodies and to make any re-appointments and (ii) fill any existing vacancies.

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved: That Council agree

 

1)            That Members be appointed to the Council’s committees as set out in appendix 1 of the minutes.

 

2)            That Councillor Kinnear be appointed to the Basingstoke Music Festival Committee.

 

3)            That Councillor Miller be appointed to Hampshire Building Preservation Trust Limited.

 

4)            That Councillors L James and Harvey be re-appointed to Vyne Community School Community Management Committee.

 

 

35/19

Ombudsman Decision - 17 012 432 pdf icon PDF 323 KB

Recommendation from the Cabinet Meeting held on 11 June 2019

 

1.    Council notes and acknowledges the important public role of the Ombudsman in scrutinising and reviewing the actions of local authorities, together with the legally binding nature of findings of maladministration and injustice that has made against the Council

2.    Council endorses the actions already taken, namely the written apology to the applicant and the procedural change to the published scheme of allocations and that housing decision letters now advise recipients of their right to complain to the ombudsman.

3.    Council authorises the payment of compensation to the applicant of £4,500 as recommended in the Ombudsman’s report.

4.    Council endorse the rejection of the recommendation in the report to make the applicant top of the list for each eligible property he bids for until that bid is successful, for the reasons stated in paragraph 3.8.1(c) of the cabinet report as it was not considered appropriate for Mr X to have priority over applicants who may be fleeing abuse or violence, or are dealing with acute and life limiting medical conditions

5.    Council endorses the action taken to backdate the applicant’s housing application to January 2013 reinstating him to the position that he would have been in had the maladministration not occurred and to note that this alternative approach has led to the applicant being rehoused.

6.    The recommendations in paragraphs 2,3,and 4 form the Council’s formal response to the Ombudsman’s recommendations under section 31 of the Local Government Act 1974 and section 5A of the Local Government and Housing Act 1989 and that the ombudsman be notified of the actions that the Council has taken

 

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Cabinet Member for Homes and Families introduced the report which set out the recommendations of Cabinet after consideration of the Monitoring Officer’s report following an investigation and a finding of maladministration causing injustice by the Local Government and Social Care Ombudsman (LGO) in relation to a homelessness case.  He added that the housing applicant had been successfully rehoused as his application had been reinstated and registration date backdated to the position he would have been had the maladministration not occurred.

 

Resolved: That

 

1.            Council note and acknowledge the important public role of the Ombudsman in scrutinising and reviewing the actions of local authorities, together with the legally binding nature of findings of maladministration and injustice that has been made against the Council.

 

2.            Council endorse the actions already taken, namely the written apology to the applicant and the procedural change to the published scheme of allocations and that housing decision letters now advise recipients of their right to complain to the ombudsman.

 

3.            Council authorise the payment of compensation to the applicant of £4,500 as recommended in the Ombudsman’s report.

 

4.            Council endorse the rejection of the recommendation in the report to make the applicant top of the list for each eligible property he bids for until that bid is successful, for the reasons stated in paragraph 3.8.1(c) of the cabinet report as it was not considered appropriate for Mr X to have priority over applicants who may be fleeing abuse or violence, or are dealing with acute and life limiting medical conditions

 

5.            Council endorse the action taken to backdate the applicant’s housing application to January 2013 reinstating him to the position that he would have been in had the maladministration not occurred and to note that this alternative approach has led to the applicant being rehoused.

 

6.            Council agree that the recommendations in paragraphs 2,3,and 4 form the Council’s formal response to the Ombudsman’s recommendations under section 31 of the Local Government Act 1974 and section 5A of the Local Government and Housing Act 1989 and that the ombudsman be notified of the actions that the Council has taken

 

36/19

Revenue and Capital Outturn for 2018/19 pdf icon PDF 825 KB

Recommendation from the Cabinet Meeting held on 11 June 2019.

 

That Council note:

 

1)            Net revenue expenditure on services in 2018/19 resulted in a favourable variation of £0.37M.

 

2)            The contributions at year end to specific reserves of £0.31M, with a residual sum of £0.06M transferred to the Stability and Resilience reserve as detailed in section 4 of the report.

 

3)            The reasons for both revenue and capital variances as detailed within the body of the report and in appendices 3 and 8 of the report. Capital expenditure in 2018/19 was £15.86M. This is £1.49M less than the last reported position.

 

4)            Contributions to and from reserves as set out in Appendices 4 and 5 of the report.

 

That Council approve:

 

5)            The slippage and re-phasing of the capital programme for 2019/20 to 2022/23 detailed in Appendix 10 of the report.

Minutes:

The Cabinet Member for Finance and Service Improvement introduced the report which presented the final revenue and capital outturn for 2018/19 and compared it with the latest approved budget providing explanations of the material variances.  The report also identified the movement in reserves in line with the approved financial polices.

 

Resolved:  That Council

 

Note:

 

1.            Net revenue expenditure on services in 2018/19 resulted in a favourable variation of £0.37M.

 

2.            The contributions at year end to specific reserves of £0.31M, with a residual sum of £0.06M transferred to the Stability and Resilience reserve as detailed in section 4 of the report.

 

3.            The reasons for both revenue and capital variances as detailed within the body of the report and in appendices 3 and 8 of the report. Capital expenditure in 2018/19 was £15.86M. This is £1.49M less than the last reported position.

 

4.            Contributions to and from reserves as set out in Appendices 4 and 5 of the report.

 

Approve:

 

5.            The slippage and re-phasing of the capital programme for 2019/20 to 2022/23 detailed in Appendix 10 of the report.

37/19

Appointment of the Executive Director of Borough Development and Deputy Chief Executive pdf icon PDF 246 KB

Recommendation from the Human Resources Committee held on 3 July 2019

 

That Council approve the appointment to the post of Executive Director of Borough Development and Deputy Chief Executive

 

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Chair of the Human Resources Committee introduced the report which recommended appointment to the position of Executive Director of Borough Development and Deputy Chief Executive following a rigorous recruitment process.

 

The Leader of the Council agreed to provide a written response to a question regarding whether the car allowance in the future would be an allowance for an electric or hybrid car.

 

Resolved: That Ian Boll be appointed as the Executive Director of Borough Development and Deputy Chief Executive.

38/19

Transport Strategy pdf icon PDF 277 KB

Recommendation from the Cabinet Meeting held on 9 July 2019

 

That Council adopt the Transport Strategy set out in Appendix One, to incorporate any amendments made to the strategy by Hampshire County Council at their 16th July adoption meeting as set out on the update sheet.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Cabinet Member for Planning, Infrastructure and Natural Environment introduced the report, which sought adoption of the Transport Strategy, a key document to support delivery of the Adopted Local Plan, which had been prepared and consulted on in partnership with Hampshire County Council.

 

Members were generally in support of the Transport Strategy and made a number of comments which included:

 

·         Lessons could be learnt from looking at the model for the provision of bus services on the continent to reduce car usage and air pollution.

·         The deadline for expenditure needs to be more flexible in relation to major improvement projects to take into account other linked projects.

·         It is important to encourage a step change in attitude to moving about the town and creating health and wellbeing benefits by developing strategic corridors for walking and cycling.

·         Concern that there is a lack of commitment from Hampshire County Council regarding a Western bypass.

·         Disappointment that the strategy does not refer to a railway station at Oakley, which could provide positive transport options for residents.

·         The strategy needs to be a living document.

·         There is a significant infrastructure funding deficit which must be resolved to achieve the aims of the strategy.

·         Public transport has a key role to play in climate change and equality; park and ride is essential to allow people to access services and school transport is a fundamental problem faced by many parents.

·         Connectivity between communities is vitally important.

 

Resolved: To adopt the Transport Strategy set out in appendix 1 of the report.

39/19

Housing Investment Strategy - Improving Access to home ownership pdf icon PDF 502 KB

Recommendation from the Cabinet Meeting held on 9 July 2019.

 

That Council agree a new capital scheme ‘Council help to buy: Equity Loan Scheme’, with a budget of £0.580m funded from S106 receipts.

 

 

Minutes:

The Cabinet Member for Homes and Families introduced the report which sought approval for a new capital scheme to improve access to home ownership and promote low cost home ownership for younger households on median and low incomes.

 

There was a range of mixed views regarding the proposal.  Comments included:

 

·         The scheme would help young people trapped in the rental cycle to get on the housing ladder.

·         The council has a responsibility to ensure young people can afford to live in the borough.  The scheme will help young people on the housing register and help them to buy property rather than rent.

·         The Help to Buy national scheme is restricted to new builds which are in short supply, this proposal would help local people to buy existing housing.

·         Concerns were expressed regarding the significant legal risks identified in the use of S106 contributions for off-site delivery of affordable housing being used to fund the scheme and the eligibility criteria.

·         Concerns were raised regarding how assistance would be prioritised to those on the housing register and that the eligibility criteria was too narrow.

·         Whilst the scheme will help 20 households, there are many more on the housing register.

·         Concerns were expressed regarding the interest rate payment due after 5 years on top of the mortgage payment already being made and the impact that would have on the ability to move house.

·         Concern that the council is acting as a bank lending money to a select few residents when it should be improving services to all residents.

·         The S106 money could be put to better use such as a housing scheme at Sandringham court which could provide 13 new homes.

·         Many young people are living at home for longer as they can’t afford the deposit required to secure a mortgage.  The proposed scheme would provide a wider opportunity for young people to own their home and stay living in the borough.

·         Concern that a large number of people privately renting and housing association tenants would be excluded from benefiting from the scheme.

·         This is an example of the council using its reserves imaginatively for the benefit of residents who find it hard to achieve home ownership.

·         If S106 money is not used it would eventually have to be returned to the developer. The scheme would be a good use of a small amount of the money for the benefit of a group of residents.

·         The Invest to Grow Fund would have been a more appropriate source of funding for the scheme. 

·         S106 money should have been used for social housing, however there was no appropriate process in place, which should be addressed.

·         The capital receipts must be reinvested in the scheme or ring-fenced for social housing not used for other priorities.

 

The Cabinet Member for Homes and Families thanked Members for their contributions and confirmed that additional legal advice had been received which advised that it was appropriate to use S106 funds for the scheme and if the proposal was approved discussions  ...  view the full minutes text for item 39/19

40/19

Treasury Management Annual Report 2018/19 pdf icon PDF 909 KB

Report of the Executive Director of Finance and Resources (Section 151 Officer)

Minutes:

Resolved: That the report be noted.

41/19

Annual Overview and Scrutiny Report 2018-19 pdf icon PDF 241 KB

Report of the Interim Democratic Services Manager.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved: That the report be noted.

42/19

Motions to Council pdf icon PDF 227 KB

Report of the Monitoring Officer.

Minutes:

The Mayor introduced the report which set out recommendations of the Monitoring Officer to changes to rule 14 of the Councils Rules of Procedure, to ensure the smooth running of council meetings.

 

The Cabinet Member for Finance and Service Improvement proposed an amendment to the recommendation to provide clarity should an unlawful motion be submitted.  She added that the amendment placed responsibility for decision making on the Mayor in consultation with the Monitoring Officer and clarified steps to be taken to shape a motion to ensure that it is lawful to enable it to be debated by council. 

 

Members debated the proposal.  Some members felt that the changes should be discussed through the Constitutional Working Group (CWG) and were concerned that the process would not be open and transparent if motions were excluded from the council agenda.  Other members welcomed the amendment and considered it would aid meaningful motions and felt there had been a cross party discussion on the proposal at the Group Leaders meeting.  Furthermore, members were reminded that motions had been discussed in depth previously by the CWG although recommendations had not been put forward to Council.

 

The amendment was put to a vote with 34 votes in favour, 21 against and 3 abstentions and therefore carried.  The substantive motion was carried with 34 votes in favour, 22 against and 2 abstentions.

 

Resolved: That council agree an amendment to rule 14 – Motions on Notice to the Council Rules of Procedure as follows:

 

1.            That paragraph 14.1 be renumbered to 14.1.1 and revised to require Notice of Motions to be given in writing to the Chief Executive no later than 4pm on the ninth working day before the Council meeting.

 

2.            That the following paragraphs be inserted:

 

14.1.2       If notice is given of any Motion which proposes action that is considered to be ultra vires, unconstitutional or otherwise illegal by the Monitoring Officer, the Mayor may:

 

a)      propose amendments, subject to the agreement of the proposer and the seconder, to make the motion legal; and

 

b)      if the amendments are not agreed by the proposer and the seconder prior to the deadline for printing of the Council Summons then the Mayor may exclude the motion from the council agenda and the said motion shall not be printed in the Council Summons

 

14.1.3       If the Monitoring Officer considers that a motion is otherwise out of order, such motion shall be submitted forthwith to the Mayor. The Mayor shall, in his/her absolute discretion, have the right to either rule the Motion out of order or place it on the Council Summons if, in their opinion it is one that ought properly to be considered by the Members of the Council with a view to determining its validity.

 

14.1.4       In the event of a Motion being rejected, the Chief Executive shall so inform the Member giving notice as soon as reasonably practicable.

43/19

Standards Committee Annual Report 2018-19 pdf icon PDF 227 KB

Report of the Monitoring Officer.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Resolved: That the report be noted.

44/19

Variation to the Scheme of Delegation pdf icon PDF 228 KB

Report of the Monitoring Officer

Minutes:

Resolved: To agree that the amendment made by the Monitoring Officer to the Scheme of Delegation, inserting paragraph 18A as set out below, into the powers of the Head of Planning and Infrastructure shall continue to have effect.

 

“Authorise the council to enter into section 106 agreements in connection with the determination of a planning application pursuant to paragraph 10.1.2 above”.

45/19

Notice of Motion - Basingstoke & Deane Climate Emergency

Proposer:       Cllr Ashfield

Seconder:      Cllr McCormick

 

This Council notes that:

 

Climate change and the effect it is having on our planet, and will have in the years to come, has been scientifically proven and this Council fully recognises the need for society and all levels of government to respond urgently to prevent and lessen the damaging effects of human activity driven climate change.

 

The United Nation’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report published in October 2018 confirms that the world has until 2030 to avoid an increase in global temperatures above 1.5?C, at which point the impact of global warming would have devastating impacts on the planet and people’s lives.

 

On 2nd May 2019 the UK’s Committee on Climate Change report stated that the UK should legislate for and reach a net-zero emissions goal by 2050, so as to end its contribution to global warming within 30 years.

 

The BDBC Horizon 2050 vision makes it clear that the citizen of Basingstoke value highly their environment, clean air and clean water. This vision states that “Basingstoke will generate all the energy it needs and consumes all the waste it creates before 2050.”

 

We have just eleven years to make significant cuts in the greenhouse gases the vehicles, homes and businesses of our borough create.

 

Bold and early climate action can deliver economic benefits in terms of new jobs, economic savings and market and social opportunities.

 

Council further notes:

 

That meeting the challenge the environment and climate emergency poses and achieving a net zero carbon Basingstoke & Deane by 2030 will require a comprehensive response from not just the Council, but also from regional and national government, as well as private organisations, businesses and individuals.

 

That significant elements of the action necessary to achieve a net zero carbon Basingstoke & Deane by 2030 are out of the control of the Council. However, the Council can lead local action that brings key partners together at all governmental levels, as well as in the wider public and private sector to drive forward a net zero carbon Basingstoke & Deane by 2030.

 

That meeting the challenges of the environment and climate emergency must be done in such a way that does not penalise local people on low incomes and does not limit the Council’s ability to address important issues, such as the need for housing, whilst recognising that building a greener and more inclusive economy with fairness at its heart can lead to better outcomes and opportunities for local people.

 

This Council resolves to:

 

1.            Declare a ‘Climate Emergency’;

 

2.            Make Basingstoke and Deane Borough Council operations carbon neutral by Dec 2022 by ensuring that 100% of its heating and electrical needs are meet from renewable sources and cease the purchase and/or lease of any vehicle that is not low carbon;

 

3.            Pledge to work towards making Basingstoke & Deane net zero carbon by 2030, ahead of the current 2050 target, ensuring that reducing carbon emissions is embedded in all relevant Council decision making;

 

4.            Develop carbon  ...  view the full agenda text for item 45/19

Minutes:

The following motion was proposed by Councillor Ashfield and seconded by Councillor McCormick

 

This Council notes that:

 

Climate change and the effect it is having on our planet, and will have in the years to come, has been scientifically proven and this Council fully recognises the need for society and all levels of government to respond urgently to prevent and lessen the damaging effects of human activity driven climate change.

 

The United Nation’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report published in October 2018 confirms that the world has until 2030 to avoid an increase in global temperatures above 1.5?C, at which point the impact of global warming would have devastating impacts on the planet and people’s lives.

 

On 2nd May 2019 the UK’s Committee on Climate Change report stated that the UK should legislate for and reach a net-zero emissions goal by 2050, so as to end its contribution to global warming within 30 years.

 

The BDBC Horizon 2050 vision makes it clear that the citizen of Basingstoke value highly their environment, clean air and clean water. This vision states that “Basingstoke will generate all the energy it needs and consumes all the waste it creates before 2050.”

 

We have just eleven years to make significant cuts in the greenhouse gases the vehicles, homes and businesses of our borough create.

 

Bold and early climate action can deliver economic benefits in terms of new jobs, economic savings and market and social opportunities.

 

Council further notes:

 

That meeting the challenge the environment and climate emergency poses and achieving a net zero carbon Basingstoke & Deane by 2030 will require a comprehensive response from not just the Council, but also from regional and national government, as well as private organisations, businesses and individuals.

 

That significant elements of the action necessary to achieve a net zero carbon Basingstoke & Deane by 2030 are out of the control of the Council. However, the Council can lead local action that brings key partners together at all governmental levels, as well as in the wider public and private sector to drive forward a net zero carbon Basingstoke & Deane by 2030.

 

That meeting the challenges of the environment and climate emergency must be done in such a way that does not penalise local people on low incomes and does not limit the Council’s ability to address important issues, such as the need for housing, whilst recognising that building a greener and more inclusive economy with fairness at its heart can lead to better outcomes and opportunities for local people.

 

This Council resolves to request Cabinet to:

 

1.     Declare a ‘Climate Emergency’.

 

2.     Make Basingstoke and Deane Borough Council operations carbon neutral by Dec 2025 by ensuring that 100% of its heating and electrical needs are met from renewable sources and cease the purchase and/or lease of any vehicle that is not low carbon.

 

3.     Pledge to work towards making Basingstoke & Deane net zero carbon by 2030, ahead of the current 2050 target, ensuring that reducing carbon emissions is  ...  view the full minutes text for item 45/19

46/19

Notice of Motion - Manydown Country Park

Proposer:       Cllr Frost

Seconder:      Cllr Bound

 

This Council requests that the Cabinet Member for Regeneration and Property and the Cabinet Member for Planning, Infrastructure and the Natural Environment work with our appointed master-developer partners for Manydown to ensure that as soon as possible after planning approval for the Manydown development, the Country Park is opened and made accessible for all the residents of the Borough including Rooksdown, Wootton St Lawrence, Winklebury, Buckskin and Oakley.

Minutes:

The following Motion was moved by Councillor Frost and seconded by Councillor S Bound:

 

This Council requests that the Cabinet Member for Regeneration and Property and the Cabinet Member for Planning, Infrastructure and the Natural Environment work with our appointed master-developer partners for Manydown to ensure that as soon as possible after planning approval for the Manydown development, the Country Park is opened and made accessible for all the residents of the Borough including Rooksdown, Wootton St Lawrence, Winklebury, Buckskin and Oakley.

 

Councillor Keating proposed an amendment to remove the words “including Rooksdown, Wootton St Lawrence, Winklebury, Buckskin and Oakley”, which was agreed by the proposer.

 

Members were supportive of the motion.

 

Resolved: That the Motion be referred to the Cabinet.

 

 

47/19

Notice of Motion - Housing Standards

Proposer:       Cllr Ruffell

Seconder:      Cllr Capon

 

This Council is concerned that there are new homes being built in the Borough which, despite the best efforts of the Borough Council, have faults and design failures that cause considerable anxiety to their new occupants.

This Council believes that all developers should seek to build every new home to high standards: a home that everyone would be happy to live in. That is what this Council has committed to do at Manydown.

 

This Council believes that if new houses are built, that have failures in design or rapidly deteriorate in quality, then the developers who built those houses should be held to account and made to remedy those failures or defects.

 

This Council welcomes the Government’s consultation

 https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/812038/Redress_for_Purchasers_of_New_Build_Homes_and_the_New_Homes_Ombudsman_.pdf

 

This Council requests that the Cabinet Member for Planning, Infrastructure and the Natural Environment write to the Government in response to the consultation encapsulating the views of Full Council in relation to this consultation.

Minutes:

Councillor Ruffell proposed and Councillor Capon seconded the following motion:

 

 

This Council is concerned that there are new homes being built in the Borough which, despite the best efforts of the Borough Council, have faults and design failures that cause considerable anxiety to their new occupants.

 

This Council believes that all developers should seek to build every new home to high standards: a home that everyone would be happy to live in. That is what this Council has committed to do at Manydown.

 

This Council believes that if new houses are built, that have failures in design or rapidly deteriorate in quality, then the developers who built those houses should be held to account and made to remedy those failures or defects.

 

This Council welcomes the Government’s consultation

 

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/812038/Redress_for_Purchasers_of_New_Build_Homes_and_the_New_Homes_Ombudsman_.pdf

 

This Council requests that the Cabinet Member for Planning, Infrastructure and the Natural Environment write to the Government in response to the consultation encapsulating the views of Full Council in relation to this consultation.

 

Members debated the motion and provided a range of comments which included:

 

·         House building faults can have a detrimental effect on residents’ wellbeing and lives.

·         Problems should be dealt with in a timely manner at no cost to the customer.  There should be a statutory scheme for redress.

·         Right to inspect the property before purchase.

·         Developers need to be held to account.

·         Developments should be built to the correct standard and quality in the first place.

·         The ombudsman must have the power to effect change on the developers.

·         There should be more power for local authorities to ensure standards are met. 

·         Planning applications should be detailed and local authority planners should inspect the work to ensure the specifications in the planning application were delivered.

·         Developers should be licensed which could be revoked in the case of sub-standard work.

·         Regulation should have effect and penalties.

 

The Cabinet Member for Planning, Infrastructure and Natural Environment summarised the three key points raised in debate:

 

·         Certification prior to occupancy

·         The requirement for easy enforcement post occupancy

·         Penalties should be linked to future permissions

He agreed to respond to the consultation on behalf of the council, and encouraged members to also respond.

Resolved: That the Motion be referred to the Cabinet.

 

48/19

Notice of Motion - Climate Emergency

Proposer:       Cllr Mahaffey

Seconder:      Cllr Carruthers

 

Council notes:

 

1.        That the ‘Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C’, published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in October 2018, (a) describes the enormous harm that a 2°C average rise in global temperatures is likely to cause compared with a 1.5°C rise, and (b) confirms that limiting Global Warming to 1.5°C may still be possible with ambitious action from national and sub-national authorities, civil society and the private sector.

 

2.        All levels of government (national, regional and local) have a duty to limit the negative impacts of climate breakdown.

 

3.        At present the world is on track to overshoot the Paris Agreement’s 1.5°C limit before 2050. In order to reduce the chance of runaway global warming and limit the effects of climate breakdown, it is imperative that we as a species reduce our CO2eq (carbon equivalent) emissions from their current 6.5 tonnes per person per year to less than 2 tonnes as soon as possible.

 

4.        Individuals cannot be expected to make this reduction on their own. Society needs to change its laws, taxation, and infrastructure to make low carbon living easier and the new norm.

 

5.        Basingstoke and Deane Borough Council has already made positive progress, but more can be done. The Independent Panel on Climate Change in its October 2018 report was very clear that action from all parts of society is necessary and local government has a responsibility to lead the way.

 

6.        Bold local climate action can deliver economic and social benefits in terms of new green jobs, economic savings and market opportunities, as well as much improved well-being for Basingstoke and Deane residents – for example through encouraging healthy, active travel and improving green spaces and access to nature.

 

7.        Councils around the world are responding by declaring a ‘Climate Emergency’ and taking action to address this emergency.

 

Council requests that:

 

1.        This Council declares a ‘Climate Emergency’;

 

2.        Basingstoke and Deane Borough Council pledges to make its activities carbon neutral by 2030, taking into account both production and consumption emissions;

 

3.        We receive a report to full Council within six months setting out immediate actions the Council will take to address this emergency;

 

4.        We ensure that all strategic decisions, budgets and approaches to planning decisions are in line with a shift to zero carbon by 2030;

 

5.        We request that the Council’s Cabinet and Policy and Scrutiny Committees consider the impact of climate change and the environment when implementing and reviewing Council policies and strategies, with 'Environmental Impact' listed in reports and documents;

 

6.        We support, influence and inspire other relevant agencies, businesses and residents within our Borough towards making the entire area zero carbon within the same timescale and to consider their other obligations to our natural environment such as the use of single use plastics;

 

7.        We actively lobby the Government to provide additional powers and resources needed to meet the 2030 target;

 

8.        We work collaboratively with local groups such  ...  view the full agenda text for item 48/19

Minutes:

The Motion was withdrawn.

49/19

Notice of Motion - Climate Emergency

Proposer: Cllr McKay

Seconder: Cllr G James

 

Council notes:

 

That the impact of climate change is already causing serious damage around the world.

That, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) special report published in January 2019, the world is now on track to overshoot the Paris Agreement’s 1.5°C limit before 2050 – the consequences of which would be dire and irreversible.

 

That the IPCC report tells us that limiting global warming to 1.5°C may still be possible – but only with ambitious action from national and sub-national authorities, civil society, the private sector, and local communities.

 

That a strategy based on year on year reduction of carbon emissions is no longer enough.

 

That a growing number of UK local authorities have already passed “Climate Emergency” motions.

 

That the UK parliament has passed a “Climate Emergency” motion and that the UK Government has acknowledged there is a climate emergency.

 

Council therefore commits to:

 

Declare a “Climate Emergency”.

 

Make the Council’s activities carbon neutral by 2030.

 

Make the Borough carbon neutral, taking into account both production and consumption emissions, by 2050.

 

Work with partners and stakeholders across the Borough to deliver these new goals through all relevant strategies and plans and drawing on local, national and global best practice.

 

Publish these commitments in a Basingstoke & Deane Borough Climate Strategy; bringing forward the renewal of the current document that covers 2014-2020.

 

 

Minutes:

The Motion was withdrawn.

50/19

Notice of Motion - Recycling from flats and apartments

Proposer; Cllr Jack Cousens

Seconder; Cllr Janet Westbrook

 

Council notes that;

 

1) In the 2017/18 “Let’s Recycle” analysis of local councils, Basingstoke & Deane Borough Council ranked 316th out of 345 authorities

 

2) In their analysis, our council sent 28.6% of our household waste collection for reuse, recycling or composting.

 

3) Maximising recycling leads to a better environment

 

4) There is potential to increase the recycling rates for flats and apartment blocks across the whole of Basingstoke & Deane

 

Council recommends that;

 

1) Steps are taken to improve the recycling rate from its current levels

 

2) Investigates any barriers to maximising recycling potential from flats and apartment blocks

 

 3) Creates a task & finish group to investigate the matter further and report its findings to CEP

 

Minutes:

The following Motion was proposed by Councillor Cousens and seconded by Councillor J Westbrook:

 

Council notes that;

 

1.     In the 2017/18 “Let’s Recycle” analysis of local councils, Basingstoke & Deane Borough Council ranked 316th out of 345 authorities

 

2.     In their analysis, our council sent 28.6% of our household waste collection for reuse, recycling or composting.

 

3.     Maximising recycling leads to a better environment.

 

4.     There is potential to increase the recycling rates for flats and apartment blocks across the whole of Basingstoke & Deane

 

Council recommends that;

 

1.     Steps are taken to improve the recycling rate from its current levels.

 

2.     Investigates any barriers to maximising recycling potential from flats and apartment blocks.

 

3.     Creates a task & finish group to investigate the matter further and report its findings to CEP

 

Members discussed the motion and comments made included:

 

·         Lack of provision of bins for residents in flats results in contaminated waste and overflowing bins.

·         Residents want to recycle, it needs to made easier for people.

·         Bins storage areas need to be improved in relation to lighting, smell and provision of bins for glass recycling.

·         There needs to be better accountability between landlords and the council regarding bin storage areas.

·         There should be clear signage in bin areas or stickers on bins indicating what could and could not be recycled.

·         Consideration should be given to a roadside food waste collection service.

 

Members supported the motion.

 

Resolved: That the Motion be referred to the Community, Environment and Partnerships Committee.

51/19

Questions to the Chair of Cabinet and/or a committee

To receive questions from members in relation to the minutes of the meetings detailed below:

 

Committee

Meeting Date

Council

9 May 2019

Cabinet

14 May 2019

Development Control Committee

15 May 2019

Council

16 May 2019

Economic, Planning and Housing Committee

6 June 2019

Standards Committee

10 June 2019

Cabinet

11 June 2019

Development Control Committee

12 June 2019

Scrutiny Committee

18 June 2019

Community, Environment and Partnerships Committee

19 June 2019

 

Minutes:

There were no questions.

52/19

Questions from Members of the Council on notice

Minutes:

Question 1 -  Councillor Cubitt

 

In 2014 our Transport Assessment by Parsons Brinckerhoff and commissioned by the Council was extremely clear that in the event that Manydown was built, we needed to build a Western Bypass joining up to Junction 7 M3. At our EPH Committee on 1st November 2018 and clearly recorded in the minutes of that same meeting the Committee requested that, inter alia, the Western Bypass be mentioned in Strategy Theme 5 and Strategy Theme 7. The Western Bypass has not been mentioned. EPH Committee’s requests have been ignored. Why?

 

Answer  - Cabinet Member for Planning, Infrastructure and Natural  Environment

 

Madam Mayor may I thank the Deputy Mayor for her question.  Can I draw her attention to page 254 of the agenda which says under the section ‘Looking Beyond the Local Plan – supporting longer-term housing and jobs growth’, “based on initial assessment, some of the key longer-term transport infrastructure considerations might include: Investigating strategic multimodal improvements between the A30 (west) and the A339 (e.g. a western relief/distributor road)”.  I can assure Madam Mayor and all Members here, that I have at every meeting with our officers and every meeting with Hampshire County Council, insisted that a western relief road remains on our agenda as part of this transport strategy and I would like to urge all Members to encourage the county council, in particular to have it on their agenda and encourage our County Councillors of all political parties to insist that a wester relief road is on the county council’s agenda.

 

Supplementary Question – Councillor Cubitt

 

At that same EPH meeting we were advised by transport experts that if the A33 was dualled from M4 to M3 it would result in Basingstoke becoming a dormitory town which would destroy our local economy. Can the Cabinet confirm they will not support the dualling of A33 in our Borough?

 

Supplementary Answer - Cabinet Member for Planning, Infrastructure and Natural  Environment

 

I have consistently from before I was a portfolio holder to the present date, said that I am not convinced and do not support the case for dualling the A33.  In my view, bearing in mind there is limited resources, the county council and national government should be focusing their attention on the western bypass and given the choice between the two, it is the western bypass which is most needed.  Dualling the A33 will result in my view of only encouraging more traffic from elsewhere to come through that road rather than actually assisting any of the residents of Basingstoke and Deane and bearing in mind my priority as Cabinet Member is to do what is right for Basingstoke and Deane.  As someone who has regularly used the A33 over the last fifteen years, I know exactly the strains and stresses on it.  It regulates itself in terms of through traffic avoiding it rather than by creating a dual carriageway that will send even more traffic in, create more fumes and bad air for the new  ...  view the full minutes text for item 52/19